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Tenancy Agreement Scotland 2017

Tenancy Agreement Scotland 2017: What You Need to Know

If you`re a landlord or a tenant in Scotland, you need to know about the new tenancy agreement that came into effect in December 2017. The Private Housing (Tenancies) (Scotland) Act 2016 introduced a new type of tenancy agreement, the Private Residential Tenancy (PRT), which replaces the previous types of tenancy agreements.

Here are the key things you need to know about the tenancy agreement Scotland 2017:

1. The PRT lasts until the tenant or the landlord ends it

Unlike the previous tenancy agreements, the PRT has no fixed term, which means it can last indefinitely. However, the tenant or the landlord can end the tenancy by giving the other party notice.

2. The PRT cannot be ended without a reason

In the previous tenancy agreements, landlords could end the tenancy for any reason, as long as they gave the tenant notice. Under the PRT, landlords can only end the tenancy for specific reasons, such as the tenant not paying rent or breaching the tenancy agreement.

3. The notice periods are longer

Under the PRT, the notice periods for both landlords and tenants are longer than under the previous tenancy agreements. For example, landlords must give tenants at least 28 days` notice if they want to end the tenancy after the first six months, and tenants must give landlords at least 28 days` notice if they want to end the tenancy after the first six months.

4. The PRT covers all types of tenancies

The PRT replaces all types of tenancy agreements, including assured and short assured tenancies. This means that all new private residential tenancies in Scotland will be PRTs.

5. The PRT offers more protection for tenants

The PRT offers more protection for tenants than the previous tenancy agreements. For example, landlords cannot evict tenants without a valid reason, and tenants can challenge unfair rent increases.

6. The PRT has new rules on rent increases

Under the PRT, landlords can only increase the rent once a year, and they must give tenants at least three months` notice of the increase. Tenants can challenge any rent increase that they think is unfair.

7. The PRT has new rules on repairs and maintenance

Under the PRT, landlords are responsible for ensuring that the property is in a good state of repair and that it meets minimum standards for housing. Tenants can challenge landlords who fail to carry out necessary repairs or maintenance.

8. The PRT has new rules on deposits

Under the PRT, landlords must place tenants` deposits in a government-approved tenancy deposit scheme. This is designed to protect tenants` deposits and ensure that they are returned at the end of the tenancy.

9. The PRT has new rules on subletting

Under the PRT, tenants are not allowed to sublet the property without the landlord`s permission. Landlords can refuse permission if they have a valid reason.

10. The PRT has new rules on ending the tenancy

Under the PRT, tenants must give landlords at least 28 days` notice if they want to end the tenancy after the first six months. Landlords must give tenants at least 84 days` notice if they want to end the tenancy after the first six months.

In conclusion, the tenancy agreement Scotland 2017 has introduced significant changes to the rules governing private residential tenancies in Scotland. If you are a landlord or a tenant in Scotland, it is essential that you are aware of these changes and that you comply with the new rules. If you need more information on the PRT, you can visit the Scottish government`s website or speak to a qualified professional.

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